LCMF 2015: Requiem For Reality

Dec 17 2015 19:00 - 22:30

Ambika P3 Gallery, 35-100 Marylebone Rd, NW1 5 London


PLEASE NOTE: This event will start promptly at 7pm. The space will be open for entry from 6.30pm.

Milton Babbitt Reflections (1975)
Jacob TV Grab It! (1999)
Brigitta Muntendorf Public Privacy No. 2 (2013) (UK premiere)
Neele Hülcker Copy! (2014) (UK premiere)
Jennifer Walshe Total Mountain (2014) (UK premiere)
Felicita Live set
James Ferraro New work

Performers
Mark Knoop piano (Babbitt, Muntendorf)
Felicita
James Ferraro
Nick Goodwin electric guitar (TV)
Neele Hülcker
Jennifer Walshe

Some call it Post-Internet Art. Others the New Aesthetic. Whatever the name, there's no doubt that the internet has scrambled the way we think, see and listen. Yet if art has placed this new paradigm at its heart, we are only now beginning to distil what it means for musical composition.

One pioneer of musical attempts to understand how things have changed in the digital shadow is Jennifer Walshe. The final night of LCMF will see the UK premiere of her latest major, one-woman work Total Mountain.

Two further UK premieres arrive from Germany. Berlin-based Neele Hülcker investigates the online phenomenon of 'autonomous sensory meridian response' or ASMR in her work Copy!, while Brigitta Muntendorf explores the YouTubed bedroom in Public Privacy No 2.

The flight from reality captured by this Post-Internet Music is not new. Serialist trailblazers like Milton Babbitt got here first with works such as Reflections for piano and synthesized tape. The hyperactive, networked aesthetic of Walshe and others, meanwhile, was foreshadowed by Jacob TV in Grab It!

As an occasional collaborator with London-based collective PC Music, Felicita's music is one in which the tropes of pop's most commercial statements are accelerated, amplified and brought riotously together into a language that, if satirical, is also wildly inventive in its own right.

We conclude and project into the future with the long-awaited UK return of James Ferraro, whose 2011 album Far Side Virtual is an essential post-internet text. For his forthcoming release Skid Row, Ferraro turns his attention to contemporary Los Angeles, a kind of 'hyper-America' where violent realities are obsessively mediated and reproduced.

Advance

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